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big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
.c. should be the 51st state of the united states of america. statehood for 600,000 residents . finally, let it go forth that this is not only a commemoration, a continuation, but what you have here are two generations that have come together. there's a lot said about the joshua generation, the younger people. but i remind them it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side by side together and so let this be a day in which moses points the way for joshua and the walls of segregation, of racism, materialism come tumbling down. with that, let me introduce our first speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy, committee of the national egislation, dr. michael chang. the day after king died, robert kennedy spoke on the mindless men as of violence. here is what he said. what has violence accomplished? what has it created? we tolerate a rising level of violence. we flor if i killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire weapons. we honor swagger and wielders of force. we excuse those who are willing to
much america's diminishing influence throughout the middle east. one of the reasons the gulf states radio angry with the united states not only because of what happened today in egypt. it's because they see the president is weak on iran, weak on syria and israeli settlements and now they feel -- >> all of the leff village gone. >> and now they are stepping in and they have the means to do it. >> thank you both very much. >> thank you. >> online we have a map that shows where all u.s. military aid guess. still to come on "the news hour," al-jazeera america has its debut. same sex marriage in the states. the dolphins day at the white house. and lyme disease on the rise. first the eerp news of the day. >> pakistan's former president the some point in time be was smrmt there to -- weep have a report narrated by john gla armed personnel were stationed around the courthouse. this was not a moment that mush would treasure. he seemed reluctant to get out of his vehicle. but the country's former military ruler had little choice. he had been summoned to court. prosecutors were ready to indict
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
the nation. 1963od with dr. king in when he called on america to be true to its principles. five years later, dr. king stood without me in the sanitation workers of local 1733 demanded justice, dignity and respect. the journey for civil rights, workers rights and economic rights began almost in the moment america was born. it gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned standup, fight back and march forward. because our struggle continues, we come to this but mario not only to commemorate -- this memorial, not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. we have a power to carry determination, hope and passion of the march on washington forward. we must also have the courage. when must also have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a philip randolph, bayard rustin, john lewis. on behalf of those whose names will never be known. we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor , to the ceo and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. we have the responsibility to
to work. how would dr. king see the current racial situation in america? >> it took guts to do that then. and it's going to take guts to finish the job now. >> it is the collapse of the traditional family that is wreaking havoc in the african-american community. >> i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps. >> the other issue is racial profile acvoter identification requirements. while somewhat important are essentially a sideshow, a sideshow. a sideshow. >> stand tall in your community. fight for diversity. understand its strength. >> sideshow. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out. and get in the way! make some noise! >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that the men are made to live together as brothers. >> sideshow. if dr. king were alive today, i believe he would be brokenhearted about what has happened to the traditional famil family. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching "the ed show" right here 5:00 monday through friday. chris matthews is at 7:00. stick around to watch his show. bi
in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slow up. we have a moral obligation to press on because of our love for america and our love for the democratic way of life, we must keep moving. in san francisco in 1956 to the mall in 1963 to america today, dr. king's message endures. we must keep moving. our heritage and our hope. advancing civil or voting rights. within two years after the march, there would be a historic civil rights act and a voting rights act. that is
to the scientists and allowed america to take the lead and develop the atomic bomb. by the time the bombs were dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki the british role in all of this have been completely forgotten. the sad part of the story is later in his life churchill who was kind of dismissed with nuclear technology throughout his career as a politician suddenly becomes aware of how destructive and how dangerous it is existentially. he only had that realization 20 years earlier it would have reshaped what became a nuclear arms locally. at the time i think he was just really unaware of the potentiality of atomic energy and dismissed it and kept saying i'm very happy with explosives we are to have. >> lara heimert a lot of the conversation here at bookexpo america this year is about e-books still. does basic have been approached to e-books? have they been helpful to your business? >> we love e-books. we love it when people have more ways to read books and what we find is a lot of people toggle between the two. they don't become exclusive e-book readers and don't assert their bookshelves. i use my
heart. he wanted white america to see what they were doing. he wanted white america to see how hurtful it was. >> the letter was a national call to the conscience of america using real life, real time reality of birmingham as it's template. birmingham then became the spark that ignited the prairie fire of negro existence that was transformed into negro revolution. >> today thousands of people are expected to be in washington to celebrate the legacy of martin luther king jr. joining us now from a los angeles, president of the beverly hills hollywood branch naacp and member of the national board. thank you for being with us today. >> thank you for having me here, morgan. >> president obama is going to speak at the exact spot where dr. martin luther king spoke 50 years ago today. what do you hope to hear him say? >> well, i'm sure, and i hope that he will talk about the progress that we as america has made, and we as african-americans have really looked forward to in terms of being able to relate to society in terms of the progress that it has offered to people of color, black, other race
lyons recounts the introduction of the enlightenment to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its development. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. [laughter] that's always good to hear a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, my wife and i have only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we're based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and i'll probably always miss, and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book and most of my three earlier books as well. but i know that quality of life and the quality of discourse, particularly civic discourse, will be greatly improved. [laughter] and i know, also, that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that i'm speaking here tonight, and he would commend this institution on its civic-mindedness. franklin was known as a projector, that is he loves social projects, and
of an america where all citizens would sit together at the table of brotherhood. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prophecy unmatched in our time. >> good afternoon. i'm tamron hall. 50 years and nearly two generations and here we stand, a nation reflecting on one of the greatest moments in our history. and a guiding light for our future. the faces of those carrying the torch lit by dr. martin luther king jr. were back today, retraitsing the steps taken by a quarter million americans seeking equality and jobs. it's also today where the first african-american president, arguably the personification of dr. king's dream addressed the crowd in the shadow of greatness. dr. king's speech was incredibly just under 17 minutes long. 1651 words, he was only 34 years old. a speech delivered in a different age at the time carried by just a few networks without the power of the internet or twitter or facebook to help spread that message. it is a speech that the king family closely protects, making sure to preserve the legacy of an iconic leader. now, 50 years later, on this historic ann
to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its develop and. this is a little over one hour. >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. it's always good to get a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, i wife and i only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we are based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book, most of my three or their books as well. but i know the lord of life and quality of discourse will be greatly improved. and i know also that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that if speaking here tonight and that he would commend this institution on its civic mindedness. franklin was what was known as a projector. he loves -- loud projects, social projects. knowledge was a social activity and that was exemplified by the program get here at town hall. i do have to say one thing. i think he would probably frown
to this deployment of chemical weapons is in america's core self interest, and the president said the syrian government carried these attacks out. if you circumstance -- circle a couple of dates on the calendar here, you mentioned those un inspectors. it's very clear that the administration or any allied coalition is not going to initiate an attack while those un inspectors are on the ground. then tuesday the president is scheduled to leave the country. he was going to go see putin, and that got changed, instead he is going sweden before going to the g20 meeting. a lot of folks think the president might want to consult with leaders at the g20. others say that is not likely to have this hanging in the air while they are talking about the economy. also another wild-card here, if the british go wobbly in his term on this, and parlment does balk, then that throws another twist and angle into the potential timing. >> mike, tell us precedent for this. >> well, i think the most direct precedent is 1993 and 1998. 1993 a plot was uncovered tos a -- s a nate president bush. really underscoring the sym
was in america's core self interest to respond to the deployment of chemical weapons. and the president went further than he has ever gone in blaming the syrian government. he said they in fact care rid out these attacks. he reported that the top administration officials, chuck hagel, john kerry, james clapper, and the vice chairman of the joints chief of staff l be on a conference call with leadership of congress still scattered throughout the country. they will be on the phone tonight at 6:00. this is 116 members of congress, mostly conservatives from the isolationist wing that overlaps to a great degree with the tea party wing as well, joining together to write a letter insisting on congressional authorization. is that the prevailing view of leadership? it doesn't appear at this point. because john boehner in his own letter to the president raised a number of pertinent questions but did not insist the president come to congress. >> he did in fact stop just short of that. let's talk more about the leadership. once they get this briefing later on, how might this play out going forward? how
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
america involved in a costly new war in syria. the president is not telegraphing, what, if anything, he intends to do about this week's alleged chemical weapons massacre. ed henry is traveling with the president and reports from scranton, pennsylvania. >> reporter: while both he and joe biden focused on domestic issues, on the international stage president obama found his credibility on the line as he used a cnn interview to comment about the alleged chemical weapons attack in syria that may have killed up to 1,800 people. >> when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale and again we're still gathering information about this particular event, it is very troublesome. that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has. both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating and needing to protect our allies. >> reporter: that was a nod to deliberation sources say are happening inside the administration over whether the u.s. military will use cruise missiles to punish syrian president bashar al assad yet the presiden
♪ ♪ ♪ imus in the morning ♪ >> america's middle class crushed, taxed, regulated, stuffed into part-time jobs and the numbers do not lie. good morning, everyone. here is the number. 4.4%. that's the decline, repeat, decline in median income in the obama years. averaging income down even more, and there's more on that. two big-name employers cut health care coverage because of obamacare. do you remember that promise, you could keep the coverage you like, not happening. today, the president starts a bus tour, speaking to friendly college audiences. he'll push a free ride for college students, funded in part by taxpayers. that is the theme of the show today. the middle class, struggling big time and getting more of the same from the president. "varney & company" about to begin. ♪ make it happen with the all-new fidelity active trader pro. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades when you start using active trader pro today. >> 11:15 eastern this morning. mark that time. president obama will make his pitch to the middle class. his b
is out. >> there are many mayors across the united states of america. i just finished a conference where we have a leadership meeting, and this was a huge topic of conversation for many of the mayor's. regardless of carter -- party. most of the time mayor's did not pay that much incentive to political parties. we have to make things happen. you want folks to get the health care and want them to be well and healthy. there is a growing group of mayors across the united states of america who are actively engaged in the process, and i will do my part here. >> it really is now time for us to activate the local advocacy community. the local outreach community, -- theased communities. faith based communities. wonderful organizations like congreso this cannot be done from within washington. it never has been the idea that it would be done. we need partners on the ground. that is why the navigator branch rolled out last week. every community health center in the country has gone resources to hire education and enrollment people. a lot of hospitals are training their own staff. we of train that se
>>> good morning, america. breaking overnight. the president's tough words for syrian leader, bashar al assad, as u.n. inspectors prepare to leave syria, american warships move into position. the entire middle east bracing for an attack. and we're live from the region. >>> i wish to god these circumstances had been different. >> an abc news exclusive interview with george zimmerman's wife, speaking out for the first time about the night trayvon martin was shot. and the terrifying months in hiding with her husband. >>> breaking overnight. explosive allegations about nfl star aaron hernandez. was he using angel dust and carrying a gun at all times? now, big questions about how much patriots coach bill belichick really knew about his player's behavior. >>> shocking on the racetrack when a driver loses control. trapped him and engulfed in flames. how he walked away, racing in the same car just 30 minutes later. >>> and good morning, america. the crisis in syria continues to grow. so many developments right now, as that deadline looms for the u.n. inspectors to leave syria. there
on the country did states of america coming out of the closet and singing here is how i think the social war should be taught. should be taught in terms of people understanding on what would have happened if the war turned out differently. >> up next on the special weeknight edition of book tv. author national book award winning author nathaniel philbrick -- he discusses this in massachusetts for 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it's an honor to be introduced by a fellow nantucketer both of our kids were educated by them and it is great to see you here in brookline and it's wonderful to be in the coolidge center theater with this great bookstore and co-sponsored with the massachusetts historical society, which has been an institution that has been absolutely essential to my life as a historian. i sometimes sort of feel like i've taken up residence in the archives there, and every book i've done there has been a central information that has come from there but among the more so than bunker hill. one of the characters i delve into, the papers are there at what we call the mhs and it is an
in the united states of america. i'm going to to be focused on that particular issue. right now what i needed to do is to make sure schools on on time and safely. not withstand something of the personnel reductions. the focus has to be on education, young people, what goes on in school, after school, on the weekends, during the summer, and so we beefed up many of our after-school programs as well as summer programming to make sure our kids are safe and they are learning and they are working with caring, nurturing adults. >> okay. mayor landrieu, i want to get this school question out of the way as well. i want to talk about -- specifically about other things. i want to ask the same question. as new orleans is building a new prison, is this our new reality? giving up on schools to make room for teens who will inevitably end up behind bars? >> you know, it is one of the things that we face in this nation. we are bogey to have cadillac prisons and not have schools that work. we have to get priorities right. you are never getting to the issue and mayor nutter and i want to talk about tonight. whi
in america that wants to take health care away from the poorest americans. they want to allow them to get sick and do nothing about it. and then just let them fall by the wayside. is that christian? is that what the lord did when he was on the face of the earth? now, there's many religions in our country, but the christian faith is one that is supposed to take care of its brother, to believe that the only way to heaven is through the father, and to help your neighbor and to help the sick and the poor. i don't know about you, folks, i'm sick and tired of these born-again christians preaching down on the rest of us as if they are the holy grail and the road to heaven because they have all the answers? it's all for what? to hurt people. if we repeal obamacare, if this were to go through, it would hurt americans. there's nothing christian about that. i would like an evangelical christian pastor to come on this program and explain to me where i'm wrong. the majority of americans want obamacare. we voted on it twice. we put the same guy in office who brought us obamacare. but there is this radi
learning when you look at the number of tech schools. just the sheer number. is that the case in america when you look at us compared to other industrialized countries? >> that debate goes on a lot. there's something sort of aspirational about the idea of college, about the fulfillment of the american dream. especially when you talk about, you know, parents or grandparents who didn't go to college who didn't have the opportunity. the pride they take in being able to watch their kids and grand kids be eligible for it, be able to do it. and you're right, i don't think that's something that the president's going to bring up today. the other thing here too, i think, sure, there's the issue here, has to go through republicans in congress, who knows if that's going to happen. but it's a step more removed from that. this is a philosophical moment for the president. republicans are out there in the town halls back in the districts, what are we hearing from that? a shutdown, debt ceiling fight, we want to get rid of obama care and this is obama saying while they're having that conferring, this is
do. there is this assumption that it's america's responsibility to make things better within egypt, within syria, i wish we could. i wish we could bring democracy together. it's a great mistake to think we have the power to do it, and instead we waste enormous amounts of money even trying. and also, there was movement on one issue, as rachel noted. immigration and that's because john mccain can count. every reasonable republican understands if they don't move on immigration, it's a political disaster. unfortunately, reasonable republicans are not anywhere near a majority in the house. >> let me ask you about that, it does feel to me like, i love that part of what the president is doing here is saying, you got an answer to this, go ahead and try. it also seems that the president's real challenge has been with these house republicans who won't even get in line with their own party leadership. does working with an elder like senator mccain make any difference in that kind of environment? >> unfortunately, probably not. by the way, we did get the confirmation tonight. and i think that'
here, representing the rule committees. i want to tell everybody in america, tom cole is a reasonable member of this house. he's been a leader of this house. he wants to seek common ground in my view. so i do not criticize him but i say, mr. speaker, as you tap the gavel, time is not only running out on steny hoyer, time is running out on this house, time is running out on erica, time is running out americans who know their house is not working and now i yield back the balance of my time but we should not yield the balance of time for the american people and for our country. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has no time to yield back. the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from oklahoma is recognized. mr. cole: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cole: my friend, and he is my friend is really one of the great speakers in this chamber. i mean that with all sincerity. but this isn't the senate. we don't have unlimited debate over here. kind of stretching it a little bit. but it's alway
. occupied-- >> al jazeera america. is did. >> this is the hundred page document we call obamacare. and my staff has read the entire thing. can congress say the same? >> "real money with ali velshi" tonight on al jazeera america. >> welcome back, this is a look at the top stories on al jazeera. recapping now the united nations security council is holding an emergency meeting sawing saying hundreds of people attacked the european union have expressed grave concern about the reports of the use of chemical weapons in syria. they will insure an investigation. >> a former egyptian president has anhosni mubarak will be reld from house arrest. the prosecutors say the constitution prevents them from appealing the ruling. we're learning new activities from the nsa. today we learned it the agency connected thousand of internet communications in the u.s. with no terror connections. the intent of the program was to intercept terrorist communications. we go to karen, the direct ever of the center of th of school o. are we surprised of what we're learning particularly over the last four months, and at s
south. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera america presents "into eternity". premieres sunday night 9 eastern. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> coming up on al jazeera this evening, the lingering problems with nuclear power. every day radioactive wasted from power plants is isolated. the documentary" into eternity" covers the facilities. 100,000 years scientists say living there will need to know about. dangers. >> this is probably the
constellation tour. it is the last ship built in 1954 by the u.s. navy. heritage action of america held a town hall meeting in wilmington delaware. it is the last in a series of defundingsupport the the affordable care act law. >> hello, delaware valley. it is so great to be with you. i am part of the team at heritage action. the opportunity to be here in the first state is very exciting for all of us. thank you for the warm welcome. [applause] as you know, this is a nine city true -- nine city tour about defunding obamacare across the nation. we decided that delaware and the surrounding areas are important because weme to agree with vice president biden. this bill is a big deal. it must be defunded. [applause] last night, we were in pittsburgh. we were talking to them after the program was over and they were talking about how great the pirates were doing. that is exciting for those of you that are pirates fans. they told us to give you a hard time about how they are doing better than the phillies. i told them we would have to be careful about that because the eagles have done better in the pr
-asaad must leave office. so where is america's credibility? >> reporter: the white house says the administration intends to declassify and release intelligence information. why the white house believes it was a chemical attack. bill: will he seek congressional authority before a military strike? >> reporter: the white house says it's consulting with congress as the war powers act requires. kings out of town for recess but one congressman says the president should do mow. he says the president should be making the case to the american public and his administration should come to congress to explain their plans. the consequences are too great for congress to be brushed aside. the president has been speaking with foreign leaders including british prime minister david cameron. they discussed possible consequences from the international community to syria. martha: we are told that the military assets are already in place when and if president obama does decide to order a strike. here is defense secretary chuck hagel speaking about this to the bbc. >> leaders all over the world said
and import of american man slips with ivan's made in america compared to the foreign ships with items and products made in foreign lands ? if they're is a lot of balance there at least why would we want to have more foreign chips? how many homes are we going to lose? said the one okay. >> guest: in the part of virginia i can tell you that our ratio of import to export is about 50-50 which is a great place to be. from this country we are sending over, like i said before, you know, paper and pulp and logs and agriculture and importing those foreign finished things that are made, you know, elsewhere. in the united states their is a huge push tow reassure some offshore manufacturing. the part of virginia wants to be the conduit for trade. >> host: you said it is 5050, pretty much equal. what does that matter, do you think? >> guest: we obviously want commerce coming and going from both, you know, manufacturers, producers, agriculture and the debt is states, both farmers and businesses want places to send their goods. there is a demand overseas, and we have to pay attention to both export
that writes about george washington of south america. in the civil war battle of gettysburg. >> tomorrow a military briefing in east afghanistan. we will talk about violence in the area and live coverage begins at 10:30 a.m. eastern on c-span2. >> tomorrow night on the encore presentation of first ladies. >> is unusual but i'm sure that she will tell you about this and i think that having read this and read about her, she was a very happy girl. and she goes through the official title, which wasn't normally part of this. >> the encore at a first ladies. an original on c-span. >> the first battle of the american revolution is discussed by nathaniel philbrick in his book "bunker hill: a city, a siege, a revolution." he discussed it in brookline, massachusetts. >> thank you, it is an honor to be introduced. both of the kids were educated by them and it is wonderful to see you here at brookline. corresponding with the massachusetts historical society which has been an institution that has been absolutely essential. every archive i've done has been information that has come from there essenti
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. shimkus: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to remember and recall the life of carla anderson. carla passed away on july 23, after a month-long fight against an infection. she was 52, a loving mother, devoted wife and deputy executive director of the next generation 911 institute. it was in this capacity that i had the privilege of working with her. technology continued to move forward, congresswoman anna eshoo and i worked closely as part of the congressional e-911 congress. she was part of legislation passed by congress to advance 911 services. in so doing, many lives have been saved. as first responders throughout the country could not on
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
>> welcome to al jazeera america. here is a look at our headlines. the syrian government accused of chemical warfare on its own people, the the opposition group said the government killed hundreds of women and children. former egyptian president hosni mubarak may be released from house arrest within a few hours. and bradley manning sentenced to 35 years behind bars for leaking classified information. now his attorney wants help from the president. [♪ music ] >> we begin tonight with atrocities in syria and accusations of chemical warfare. it could put more pressure on president obama to get involved in the dispute. opposition groups are claiming that the government used chemical weapons in the overnight offensive. we want to warn you that some of the pictures we want to show you are extremely graphic. they show injured people being treated by hospital workers while others lie motionless. activists athey are victims of banned chemical weapons fired by government forces. and other video shows survivors struggling to breathe. al jazeera cannot verify the videos but if proved true
, civil rights and how things have changed in america. >> one of the things that dr. king was talking about, in my opinion, it was not so much civil rights for us but civil rights period. >> reporter: a marine who served in afghanistan and iraq, and now he's a senior at the university of southern new orleans. >> we've got a bus loaded foul o--foul--full of african-americ. let's bring everyone down here. i don't care. >> reporter: on the bus many reflect on the stride made since 1963, people are also asking the question how much has been done, and how much can be done? >> people are people. everybody is the same. if america wants to be the country, a great country, everybody has to be equal. everybody has to have opportunities. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning. >> reporter: in 1963 marchers arrived by bus, train, car and foot. today 50 years later it's the same. and for the people on this bus the celebration of king's dream is the expression of hope for even greater strides towards guaranteeing the rights of all americans. robert ray
. [booing] over the next 15 months, we are going to decide what kind of america we want to have. what kind of kentucky want to have. there are only two answers to this question. barack obama's vision for america. or kentucky's. ground -- crowd does not like it. kentucky's voice is often the voice of opposition. to the obama agenda. i am proud of that. that is why every liberal in america, every liberal in america have announced they will beat us next year. know, the liberals are worried because it just as i predicted obama care is a disaster for america. [applause] i fought them every step of the way, every step of the government takeover. up to their war on coal. look, as long as i am in the senate, kentucky will have a voice. [applause] all of these liberals to come down here to push me around, they are not going to get away with it, are they? ind paul, it would fill, and -- ed whitfield, and i take the fight every single day. let me give you an example. a few months ago thomas the cannots decided that you fish below the dams below the river anymore. up the group and we got together with
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
. we have enough poor people here. is spinning out of control. let's take care of america first, and then we can help out our neighbors. but we will show you more of that debate later this evening, 1:20 in the morning, and in the west, 10:20 p.m. >> i just want to say that in if country here in america, anything took place here, we have already seen our allies, and if this event took country, we would be involved, and i think the whole world would be involved. you see your own children involved in something like this, you want to do something about it. children over in serial or in the uk or over here or somewhere else. >> eggs for your call, and getting your reaction about what happened in the british house of commons and what may happen with the obama decision on what the u.s. response would be. to 26ke this evening members of congress, according to reports. we will tell you more about that. this is from victor who said this debate is very rich and house of commons, and no one is holding back. a congressman from rhode island tweeted -- in forest hills, new york, on our democra
♪ ♪ >>> welcome to al jazerra america. here say look at the head lines. the syrian government is a used of chemical warfare on its own people, opposition groups say the government killed hundreds including women and children. getting out, former egyptian president mubarak could be released from prison in a few hours, how it could impact an already volatile situation, bradley manning is sentenced to 35 years behind bars for leaking classified information. now his attorney wants some help from the president. ♪ ♪ we begin with those disturbing pictures from syria and the allegations of chemical warfare. tonight the united nation is his calling for an investigation. opposition groups claim the government used chemical weapons on its only people last night and they claim the unverified pictures circulating today prove their point. we want to warn you some of these pricks are extremely graphic. they show injured people being treat bide hospital workers while others lie motion little, activists and opposition forces say they are victims of banned chemical weapons fired by govern
attended the u.s. army war college in pin in pennsylvania. there are security issues where the america needs cooperation. the security and the u.s. warships routinely transit an. each day in egypt fuel the call to cutoff aid. the detention of sti of spiritul leader brought this from the white house. >> that's not in line of the standard to uphold in respect to human rights. >> the relationship we skwreupt is deep. a decision to cutoff aid would carry wide reprocushions. al jazeera, washington. >> he's the associate professor of literature. welcome. >> thank you. >> give me your rea*bs to what you're seeing in egypt today and in washington. what if the united states cuts aid. what would that mean? >> i think united states should cut aid it seems to me that aid mostly to american. military cooperations for one thing. it also goes directly in to the military which is a guanator in egypt. that's been the case for a while. it seems to me that is increasingly of the society. >> the fact that egypt has been historically a strong allie of the united states what does that mean are regard to th
with a 1:05 first pitch there and of course don't forget about america's cup always ongoing. you can expect big crowds there -- they have a race that gets started at one this afternoon. if you are heading into the city today you are probably going to have company and can probably expect heavy traffic. live this morning in san francisco, alex savage. >> you just heard him mention 49erss fan fest. today's event will be the last one held at candlestick park. >>> thousands of fans will be headed to the stick to watch the team practice and grab autographs. there will be live music, face painting, photograph booths and the only time training camp will be open to the public. the festival gets going at noon and you can watch practice from two to four. 49ers alumni, the gold rush cheerleaders and current player also be there to sign autographs. >> bart negotiations resume at ten and trains will almost certainly run on monday whether or not a deal is made this weekend. the governor plans to ask a judge to stop a strike if there is no deal by tomorrow. he filed his request for a cooling off period
>> booktv has been traveling the country exploring cities across america as our local content vehicle producers talk with authors and visit special collections and independent bookstores. .. a photographer or, who was a modern-day rickey allying walker evans, we pulled off to the side of the road, came up over the road attracts, across this dirt road here, posthumous vineyard with hold up to shack. basically a tar paper shack. as we walked up we could see there were rabbit furs that had been, that were hammered onto the wall. remember knocking once, twice i've misplaced the sun still in the door creak open and there stood this black man, who looked a cute lifted out of the mrs. a 1930s. he had a stutter. later he told us he can't bless with a stutter one state at a time. his name is james dixon. he was 95 and he was living here, happy to send the 40s. he was part of this migration? who did something no blacks in america, kind of win against the grain of the great migration. the great migration within the south to north industrial cities and came west to oakland san francisco a
. i think everything you said it plays into shaping that america for the future which will be different than we see today. >> great comment. lisa? >> i have a whole list. [laughter] first full employment would be awesome and 50 years to be about to say that we started somewhere in the 2020's mabey. we worked on this. you know, i just want to also talk about the fact we are in the house of labor and, you know, there's been a long history of pacific islanders in the history in the labour movement and in a union organizing and i feel like there are many, many causes that could be framed so they could get behind whether so it was the strikes in california. there are so many labor leaders but i think that it is a large rate of incarceration and racial profiling and the south asian community very much relates to that. i think the issue with photo id. you've got older african-americans and immigrants who are like, you know that is something we can mobilize a lot more. living wages and jobs. to work on a lot of the safety net ground nobody really talks about that anymore. ther
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